The church of Ethiopia in antiquity and the middle ages – Jewish traditions, Islamic context and indigenous development. Ethiopian Christian culture dates back to the emergence of Christianity. It preserves strong Jewish traditions and flourishes in an Islamic environment since the 7th century, which makes Ethiopia a unique place to visit and study. Our seminar gives an exceptional opportunity to get to know Ethiopian Christianity, a neglected field of study in Nordic universities.

This seminar gives an exceptional opportunity to get to know Ethiopian Christianity, a neglected field of study in Nordic universities, despite the fact that several important early Jewish and Christian texts are only preserved in Ethiopic. Our focus are the connections with the Eastern Mediterranean in Antiquity and the Middle Ages.

We explore the relations to Rome, Persia, Egypt and Palestine up to the Crusades, and the distinct Ethiopian traditions in connection with Judaism and Islam. We pay attention to the diverse cultural manifestations of religion, including archaeology, art and architecture, music and literature, theology and Church practices. Participants are invited to study texts in their traditional contexts and as part of the wider material culture

We will visit the late antique city of Aksum and the world-famous rock-hewn churches in Lalibela, as well as number of ancient monasteries, participate at a pilgrimage and meet with students and professors at two Ethiopian universities.

In addition to the excursions, lectures will be given by experts on various topics. Participant are also required to prepare a short presentation on a topic based on reading materials to be announced.

For more information, updated program and application form visit the website of the Nordic Network for the Study of Judaism, Christianity and Islam in the First Millennium (NNJCI). The seminar is directed by Prof. Samuel Rubenson, Lund University, Academy Research Fellow Dr. Outi Lehtipuu, University of Helsinki, and PhD candidate, MA Mengistu Gobezie Worku, Lund University.